Making Crime, Making Criminals (Online writings)

Using examples from film and from reading, discuss the ways the the criminal justice creates law breakers and ultimately “criminals”?  What are the long term consequences here

Last day dec 6

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28 thoughts on “Making Crime, Making Criminals (Online writings)

  1. There are several ways in which criminals are created by the justice system. There are some agencies that hire people to scout areas for people that look suspicious so they can interrogate them and find some way to arrest them. There are so many charges that are based on suspicion and not actual crime that criminals are just created from normal people who happen to live in not the best areas. Minorities are especially susceptible to this because these groups are seemed to be more dangerous than white people, and this is where all of the stereotypes come from that all of these people are involved in some sort of illegal activity. It even goes back to the FHA and when they built a bunch of houses for people to buy and they did not let minorities buy them. This caused many people to live in some of the “red-lined” areas where the cops just look for people who look like they are up to something. Also, the concept of the “Mandatory Minimum” create criminals by using previous charges to make the convicted stay in jail for much longer periods of time than they earned. These people who are arrested for drugs are not given any sort of rehabilitation programs, so when they are released from jail, they just go back to doing what they were doing, and they just get arrested again, and with each additional charge, the mandatory minimum is increased, which just takes people off of the streets for the majority of their lives. Of course, most of these jails depend on their criminal counts in order to be funded, and they use these funds to upgrade their facilities, so these companies that count on the jails and prisons as their main employer support whatever tactics that these sstems use to make sure that all of their rooms are full. It is a full chain of people who create these “criminals” from people who did not harm anyone else in some sort of violence by convicting them of some sort of non-violent charge involving suspicion of drug trafficking.

  2. There are several ways in which criminals are created by the justice system. There are some agencies that hire people to scout areas for people that look suspicious so they can interrogate them and find some way to arrest them. There are so many charges that are based on suspicion and not actual crime that criminals are just created from normal people who happen to live in not the best areas. Minorities are especially susceptible to this because these groups are seemed to be more dangerous than white people, and this is where all of the stereotypes come from that all of these people are involved in some sort of illegal activity. It even goes back to the FHA and when they built a bunch of houses for people to buy and they did not let minorities buy them. This caused many people to live in some of the “red-lined” areas where the cops just look for people who look like they are up to something. Also, the concept of the “Mandatory Minimum” create criminals by using previous charges to make the convicted stay in jail for much longer periods of time than they earned. These people who are arrested for drugs are not given any sort of rehabilitation programs, so when they are released from jail, they just go back to doing what they were doing, and they just get arrested again, and with each additional charge, the mandatory minimum is increased, which just takes people off of the streets for the majority of their lives. Of course, most of these jails depend on their criminal counts in order to be funded, and they use these funds to upgrade their facilities, so these companies that count on the jails and prisons as their main employer support whatever tactics that these systems use to make sure that all of their rooms are full. It is a full chain of people who create these “criminals” from people who did not harm anyone else in some sort of violence by convicting them of some sort of non-violent charge involving suspicion of drug trafficking.

  3. Gerard Wicks

    A lot of government agencies hire people to look over a good amount of bad neighborhoods. Majority of the people are undercover and try to fit in to find out what’s going on from drug trafficking and gang activity to find a suspicious way to arrest them. There are numerous charges that are based on suspicion and not the actual crime that criminals are just created from citizens who happen to live in these terrible areas. Minorities are really affected by this because they appear to be more feared and dangerous than white people. If this isn’t discrimination and stereotyping I don’t know what is, they believe black people are always involved in anyway of illegal activity. White people can do the same crime as blacks but the black man or women will do more jail time just because they’re black. When a person spends 10-25 years in jail and are released they normal go back to jail in the next 1-3 years because they are institutionalized and that’s all they know. They can’t get a good job when they get out because they haven’t been rehabilitated so they do what they know best and that’s sell drugs to make a fast pay check. Discrimination has been going on for a long time even back when the FHA built a lot of houses for people to buy and didn’t let minorities in because they thought it would bring the value of the houses down because blacks and Mexicans are described as always loud and ignorant. So this cause all minorities to live in a huge neighborhoods where a lot of illegal activity goes on and cops lurk around just to find somebody that looks suspicious to arrest to get them off the streets. Prions now days are extremely over packed and have no room for people so they release people who have committed petty crimes to free up space in jail but the jails get paid by the government by how many people are in their prison. They use the money to fix a lot of faculties and improve things in their like education, entertainment and more security. So the more people that are in jail the more they get paid. There are a lot of innocent people locked up behind bars because of suspicion of being a drug dealer because they are hanging around in these neighborhoods. Cops believe if they get a couple of people that crime will stop but that’s not true when they are arresting innocent people who aren’t doing anything to harm anybody.

  4. According to the film The House I Live In there are so many ways in which criminals are created by our “justice system.” Our criminal justice system has been set up in a way that the laws are made around a common enemy. In the early 1950’s when the use of dangerous narcotics was on the rise the police began targeting the black community even though the addicts were from many different racial backgrounds. Because of the poverty and homeless rates in the black community their interaction with drugs was on the streets which made it much easier for law enforcement to pursue rather than in-home white users.
    Another enemy from the film were the Chinese immigrants when they were smoking opium. Opium was made illegal on the west side of the country so that the Chinese immigrants couldn’t take any more jobs from white workers. The same drug that was being smoked by higher class whites was now illegal for the new found “enemy.”
    Later in the film the prison guard talks about how the prison owners will ask a town to buy the land and build a facility for them to use then the prison will rent it from the city. This way both the city and the owners will make a lot of money for the short term off of the new prison. Then with a new city, you have to find another enemy to fill it and in the United States our prisons are mostly populated with people in on drug related charges. Then once, if ever, released from jail it’s close to impossible to get a well-paying job and it’s also hard to find somewhere to live because with no job and as a convicted felon you also can’t live in federal housing which is a violation. So they find themselves once again selling drugs and apart of the underground economy to support themselves and their family. For the 2.7 million children that have a parent behind bars this damages them as well. It sets up a cycle that they are more likely than not to fall into and become a statistic.
    In the long run, most prisons not actually doing anything to help their prisoners. They are setting up a continued cycle so that they can keep their cells full as well as their wallets.

  5. Connor Ennis
    In the modern criminal justice system, the system is designed for crime to emerge and for criminals to be born. Unfortunately for the bottom “15” percent of citizens, the criminal justice system preys on this demographic and turns them into criminals. Those who make up these demographics are minorities and poor whites, and they have a much higher risk of becoming a criminal. This is due to the fact that these groups of people scare White America, and many White Americans categorize these minorities as criminals. Because of this, there is a handicap placed on lower class members of societies because members of the higher class believe that these people will end up going the criminal route. With this idea in tact, many resources are used up on targeting poorer areas trying to catch “suspicious” citizens. For example the war on drugs is really a war between the government and those of the lower class. Legislators say that the goal is to get rid of the drugs, but they only look in the poorer communities. The overwhelming majority of prisoners in prison on drug charge are minorities and those of the lower class. This leads the public to think that drugs are only found on the streets, but this is only because the so called war on drugs is being fought only in the streets. Finally, the criminal justice system is creating lawbreakers and criminals because it is very profitable to house inmates. Just like most of the world the criminal justice system is influenced by how much profit it makes. Billions of dollars of tax payer money is spent directly on the housing of criminals. Think of the system as a business; now the number one goal of a business is to make a profit, and that is what the system is designed to do.

  6. There are a few ways in which the justice system is creating criminals and law breakers. In all reality, authorities are not just looking looking for people committing crimes, they are also stereotyping looking for ones who are wondering around looking suspicious. They find some reason to arrest them and put them into jail for drugs for up to 5-20 years, sometimes life in prison. Based off of the movie The House I Live In, there are more suspects arrested for looking suspicious rather than those who have actually committed a crime. Also pointed out in the movie, the ones who are targeted are minorities when in retrospect, the the majority of the ones using/selling drugs are whites. On top of the fact that this stereotyping is taking place, the ones who are arrested for possession or use of drugs, do not receive any rehabilitation to try and cure their sickness. So in this case, when released from prison, instead of coming out as a newly shaped person, they go right back to doing what they are known for and end up in the same place as before. It is almost a endless circle. However, without the arrests of all of the random suspicions, prisons are unable to be funded because they rely highly on criminal counts. So these “criminals” that are wondering the streets that have not committed a crime and are arrested are the criminals that the justice system are creating. Suspicion is not something to be arrested for… It is something that should be investigated more in depth before jumping to conclusion to see if the person is really up to what you think they are.

  7. It’s not that law creates these criminals, but that the law does not look for ways to change these criminals. They focus more on finding different criminals, different ways to classify a criminal. One of the major problems in the criminal justices branch is that when individuals are taken to jail they are not being taught or made understanding of their actions. In the film they talk about how when an individual makes a mistakes because any harsh time or problem they had, they now forever have to carry that burden that after they have been released from jail, and they began to seek for employment or any other opportunity; they now have to let the world know that they were in prison. Reality is people always wonder if or if not to hire these criminals, because that is the title that they are given through the eyes of society “CRIMINALS” and it’s a hard name to get rid of. The worst part of this is that when no one is willing to open their doors to them and given them a new chance or a new opportunity to life, they going seeking to their old habits. The one thing that gave them a job before. how exactly does the government expect for these individuals to find a different way to life if they are not being given that chance. So the results are that they will return back to prison. In way the criminal justices benefits to this, because reality is prison provide jobs so they need to be in function. So the Criminal justices creates things such as “Mandatory Minimum” which is where convicts get charged more time based on their past issues. The criminal justices in way finds a way to create that certain society of criminals, they push and they push until they have what they want. I’m not saying that our country seeks for more criminals, but they do show to be one of the highest number of incarcerated people compared to other countries.

  8. The criminal justice system creates criminals often through suspicion or stereotype. If there is a certain area with high crime rates, authorities will look at these regions and assume that because there has been crime there in the past, every person living the area must be a criminal or somehow associated with whatever crimes have been committed. As a result, there are people who suffer the consequences of the law just because they are in the wrong place at the wrong time. While it does make sense for the government to monitor the areas where crime occurs most often, it does not give them the freedom to target innocent people who simply live in a bad area. Too often, regular people are imprisoned simply due to suspicion, and authorities have no actual proof of a crime being committed. In cases where crime is proven and should face consequences, there is not enough being done in prisons to ensure that the crime does not reoccur. By holding someone in prison for five years because they committed a crime, then letting them go after they have served their time, the entire process is ineffective if the criminal just returns to their normal life, only to be arrested again. Not only so, but when the criminal does return to their normal life, their children or other members of their community might join in on the illegal activity, and then they become criminals and go with the original criminal when he goes back to prison, and the cycle continues. Eventually entire communities could end up in prison because of the lack of counseling and/or proper education in prisons. Unless people are taught the reasons why their actions were wrong, there will certainly be no decrease in crime rates once they are released, and it is very probable that they create more criminals and bring friends and family with them the next time.

  9. Crime is a very lucrative business. Not so much for the criminals however. It’s an incredibly risky business for them and is only turned to as a source of income as a last resort in most cases. Crime is lucrative for almost everyone else however. There are hundreds of companies that depend on jails as their top employer. Private jails are an incredibly profitable field of work to start up on. Profitable and crime-creating. As shown in the film in class, when a private investor builds a jail in a struggling town and pays rent for the land, the jail fills up whether or not the town was crime-ridden before. When the jail is still empty and needs to fill the cots, policemen are hired, and subsequently criminals are found on every corner to lock up.
    A lot of the times the criminals are drug dealers. In many struggling communities, drug dealers are looked upon by the people with very high regard. They give money to the kids to go buy shoes and food and they just really help out families in general… So it’s no wonder that they become the role models for many kids in that town. Which in turn would cause many of those kids to grow up to be drug dealers filling the jails and leaving their children fatherless and unsupported and then when the kids are old enough, they might start dealing drugs too in order to support their families.
    This cycle is simply unconducive to a healthy style of living. So why doesn’t the government invest more money in rehabilitating criminals and getting them back on their feet with a stable source of legal income rather than dropping a couple million on a jail here and there? Because they make a lot more money that way.

  10. Based on the film it is evident that minorities in poverty are targeted by law enforcement for drug related crimes. Many of the individuals incarcerated for drug related crimes are minor or non-violent drug possessions. Convicting these individuals immediately criminalizes them. Law enforcement continues to over incarcerate non-violent individuals, making the United State less safe and waste taxpayer money. The point of convicting an individual is to hopefully turn them into a law-abiding citizen but criminal justice system does not do this, it just creates an endless cycle of creating criminals. Because law enforcement is rewarded for conviction, it puts an even bigger target on minorities in poverty who are more likely to be involved in drug related crime. These crimes are easier to solve and ultimately convict an individual. In cases of rape and murder and other crimes that are not related to drugs have less efforts to be solved by law enforcements because of the amount of time it takes to convict an individual of one of these crimes. I have recently read an article that the amount of murders solved in the US has been decreasing, from 90 percent in the 1960s to below 65 percent. Even with the advancement of technology for DNA analysis, forensics etc. the unsolved murder cases continue to rise. This may be due to the fact the efforts of the police are placed into the “war on drug” in the United States. Once these individuals are found guilty of a crime, their lives are dramatically change. They are not able to be in the lives of their family for however long they are in jail/prison. This can have a great impact on the individual’s children (if they have any). Based on the conviction, the individual, after they are released, will find it harder to gain employment and have difficulty finding a source of income. The individual may then fall into poverty etc. Prison for these individuals that are non-violent is very ineffective in breaking their circle of crime.

  11. Jason McClain

    “Danbury wasn’t a prison, it was a crime school. I went in with a Bachelor of marijuana, came out with a Doctorate of cocaine.” This is a quote from one of my favorite movies, BLOW, starring Johnny Depp. This quote touches on the idea that the judicial system in America is less likely to rehabilitate people than to make them into advanced repeat offenders. In the film and in class we have learned that the majority of people serving life sentences, and the general population of prisons, are non-violent offenders. Most of these non-violent offenses are in relation to drug possession or distribution. Throughout the 20th century in the United States drug policy and enforcement has been extremely biased in targeting and sentencing of minorities. One example of this is the disparity in sentencing for powder and crack cocaine. Up until recently the sentence for one gram of crack cocaine was the same as 100 grams of powder cocaine. This law focuses on minorities and people from poor demographic regions where most of the drug trafficking happens in the streets where it is easier to be caught. This creates a self-fulfilling prophesy that we discussed in class. Law enforcement targets high poverty areas and profiles individuals to investigate. Since most resources are used in these areas there should be no surprise that the most arrests are made in these areas. When you send someone from a highly impoverished neighborhood to prison for selling drugs, you take away their ability to get most legitimate jobs. With no ability to get a legitimate job, no access to public housing and no time spent on rehabilitation while incarcerated, this creates a situation where the offender has very little options besides falling back on the underground market of drug distribution. The war on drugs, specifically crack cocaine, implemented by the Reagan administration has shown extremely effective in getting government officials elected, but has had absolutely zero impact on the number of drug dealers and drug users in the United States. The justice system has become a civil war against the poor and minority dense regions of America, and has a better chance of creating career criminals than rehabilitating non-violent offenders.

  12. The criminal justice system ultimately creates criminals by targeting certain areas and races. Numerous people are charged with different things based on suspicion because they live in a dangerous area. The criminal justice system unfairly targets minorities. Black Americans are 10.1 percent more likely to go to prison for drug offenses than white Americans and they represent 56 percent of all incarcerated people. Black Americans are just one of many minorities targeted by the criminal justice system. In the early 20th century, the Chinese immigrants in the United States, specifically California, were targeted because of their threat to the American work force. The state of California outlawed the usage of Opium because it was a common practice among the Chinese, in hopes of giving jobs back to Americans. In addition to Chinese workers being targeted, Mexican workers along the border were also targeted. Marijuana was introduced when Mexicans began coming into the United States in the early 1900’s. The drug was associated with Mexicans and foreigners, which escalated the public concern about the drug. Increased unemployment due to the great depression and increased fear of Mexicans attributed to numerous states outlawing Marijuana. Poorer communities and communities with large numbers of homeless people are targeted because the people within the communities are more likely using drugs on the streets versus behind closed doors. The targeting of poorer communities began when the FHA built homes but would not allow minorities to live in them due to stereotypes associated with them. Minorities were then forced to live in areas, which are now targeted by government agencies.

    • You make a very strong argument as you backed it up with information about each minority and the challenges they face when it comes to stereotypes and suspicion. Each of these minorities face the difficulty of escaping the targets they have and sometimes these targets lead to people of these groups to follow the paths they are set to have. Many kids who grow up in poor communities, surrounding drugs and crimes grow up to live the same life because it is all that they know. It is not that they choose to live this life but rather they feel that if those around them will always assume the worst, sometimes the worst becomes their only option.

  13. Criminals are created in the justice system through the overall concept of stereotypes. There are many contributing factors to the way these stereotypes are implemented in the justice system, and it is these factors that have formed bias opinions to those who we consider “law breakers”. A majority of our justice system feels that our key focus should be based in the areas where we believe there would be the highest rate for crime and drug use. This automatic assumption to these areas allow for those who do not fall into these categories, to get away with crimes that are just as harmful or if not more harmful. A large issue I believe the justice system is dealing with is the sense of “suspicion”. Law enforcements have created a figure for others to go off of when looking for crime. There is a large amount of charges that are only based of suspicion due to these stereotypes our systems have created. Minorities have fallen under the category of suspicion for most criminal acts and these groups of different races often face more risk because they are targeted. It is interesting to compare the statistics of white arrests versus minorities, but in reality we should all be aware that it is not just these minorities that are participating in criminal activity. There is also the issue of punishment and lack of care criminals receive. It should be argued that if someone is arrested for a drug crime, intent to reduce the likelihood of this act being done again when the prisoner is out of jail should be our main focus. To reduce this chance, the option of rehab and an opportunity for turn around should be offered. It is important to strive for positive change in inmate’s lives. Many when released from doing time are not offered full opportunity to change because the resources and ability to start a new life are scarce.

  14. The criminal justice system has laws set in place, many of which are drug related, that create more arrests crime that ultimately should not be punished. People are serving long sentences for dealing drugs such as crack cocaine, cocaine and even being in possession of large amounts of marijuana. These are crimes that should require some jail time but should not put some first time criminals behind bars for large amounts of time and even life. The film we watched stated that there are over 2 million people in jail and 1 million of them are serving time for drug related crimes. Many of these arrested are in direct correlation to when the government started their war on crime in 1971, which turned many colored and poor folks into criminals and pushed them into more poverty. The government began making large amounts of arrests and put people behind bars for long amounts of time hoping that this would reduce the amount of drugs that were flowing though communities. But still to this day there hasn’t been a big impact on drugs in communities and drugs are still very prominent in our society. But these arrests aren’t just effecting the arrestees and the communities/families themselves, but the DEA agents and police officers that are arresting these people. Many of the DEA agents commenting in the film stated that they know they are hated by everyone and feel like they aren’t making much progress on the war on drugs.

    Many of the long-term effects of the war on drugs are not putting a man or women behind bars and preventing them from moving forward with their lives but can be see in the families that they leave behind. Selling drugs for many is a source of income for their families and themselves. By taking away this member they are impacting a family to now fall farther into poverty and most likely lead their kids down a path to selling or abusing drugs. And many of these reasons are because many of the drugs have been pushed onto impoverished people for years now. Because of this the war on drugs will continue to send many people to long jail sentences because we are not teaching people why drugs are wrong but punishing them.

  15. There many ways that the justice system creates lawbreakers and criminals. And these reasons are self-perpetuating as well as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Back in the 60’s, when the FHA started redlining certain housing areas, it was easier for law officials to parole a concentrated area of minorities that was deemed “dangerous.” Since much of their time and effort was put into trying to keep these areas under control, they saw more crime here than in other non-redlined districts. Thus, like a self-fulfilling prophecy, they believed that crime was most prominent there only because they hadn’t spent enough time looking for it in other areas. Then there is also the law that states if someone is convicted of a felon, they can no longer live in public housing. This causes people, who need help, and need the support of shelter, to go back to being homeless and wandering the streets causing them to be more susceptible to selling drugs and more susceptible to being caught and convicted again because they are already on the streets. Then, these same “convicted felons,” who are almost always convicted of drug charges, are taken away from their families. This leaves a single parent household with limited funds. Thus, the children learn from what they know. They try to help their single parent and get into the same business as their other parent. This leads to a cycle that is hard to break of single families. All of these policies and ways of the justice system have created a snowball effect that hinders the ability to break the cycle of criminals. They don’t do much to help the “criminals” turn their life around. If the justice system was different, then maybe there would be less single families and less overflowing jails for people convicted on non-violent drug charges.

    • There are many ways that the justice system creates lawbreakers and criminals. And these reasons are self-perpetuating as well as a self-fulfilling prophecy. Back in the 60’s, when the FHA started redlining certain housing areas, it was easier for law officials to parole a concentrated area of minorities that was deemed “dangerous.” Since much of their time and effort was put into trying to keep these areas under control, they saw more crime here than in other non-redlined districts. Thus, like a self-fulfilling prophecy, they believed that crime was most prominent there only because they hadn’t spent enough time looking for it in other areas. Then there is also the law that states if someone is convicted of a felony, they can no longer live in public housing. This causes people, who need help, and need the support of shelter, to go back to being homeless and wandering the streets causing them to be more susceptible to selling drugs and more susceptible to being caught and convicted again because they are already on the streets. Then, these same “convicted felons,” who are almost always convicted of drug charges, are taken away from their families. This leaves a single parent household with limited funds. Thus, the children learn from what they know. They try to help their single parent and get into the same business as their other parent. This leads to a cycle that is hard to break of single families. All of these policies and ways of the justice system have created a snowball effect that hinders the ability to break the cycle of criminals. They don’t do much to help the “criminals” turn their life around. If the justice system was different, then maybe there would be less single families and less overflowing jails for people convicted on non-violent drug charges.

  16. Today’s criminal justice system is set up where crime is inevitably emerging and criminals are consequently being created. Our system has become designed for the less fortunate demographics to become the main target for the emergence of citizens being transformed into criminals. The poor and the minorities are those who are less fortunate which inherently causes them to have a more likely chance of becoming criminals. The reason for this categorization and target on a specific group of individuals is based on the stereotypes and negative beliefs that people in higher societies create for those in lower classes assuming that these minorities are destined to be a criminals simply based on where they come from or their social standings. These assumptions that upper class society come to are often inaccurate and cause for a focus to be directed to the poor. Also, putting an emphasis on suspected and specific areas only allows for more people to be deemed criminals within those limits and not elsewhere merely because most of the government resources are being utilized in those designated places like the poor when discussing war on drug related issues. The government putting these emphases on the lower class only contributes to every citizen’s thoughts and beliefs on the matters at hand. All in all, our current criminal justice system creates law-breakers that ultimately become criminals based on how profitable it can be.

  17. The criminal justices system creates turns law breakers into criminals by many different ways. Police are targeting certain groups and enforcing the “stop and frisk” policy. Due to the fact that a large amount of minorities live in low class areas they are targeting more people for random stops and they are subject to police trying to find any way to arrest them. They may have a small amount of drugs on them at this time or they could be selling drugs, it is all about suspicion and what the officers can pin on an individual especially in the colored communities. From breaking one law, a person could now have a criminal record and are publicly known as a criminal. Many individuals that were serving for non-violent crimes involving drugs are suddenly released back into society with full expectations of landing a job to support themselves. There was no rehabilitation, no time to help the prisoners learn how to live a life away from crime and sustain a healthy living. Not only does this person have to adjust to a life out of prison but many places will not hire them because of the criminal title. Many of times, they have no place to turn because they know nothing else but the drug business that they turn to selling drugs and their old habits. This only turns into a vicious cycle because they are incarcerated once again and now have multiple felonies. If our justice system spent more time rehabilitating these “criminals” there would be less out there. Referring to a video we watched in class, drug dealers are viewed as heroes amongst young children, they would provide poor hungry kids with food and sneakers and wear fancy clothing. Young children are very impressionable and if their father is no longer around they become the man of their household in charge of providing for his family. Naturally they resort to selling drugs like they saw the rich men do growing up. This is a cycle that will be hard to break, from repeat criminal offenders from children stepping into the drug game when their father or brother gets arrested- it is hard for once registered criminals to stay away from crime. If the justice system focused more on rehabilitating real criminals and not over-punishing simple rule breakers based on skin color, there would be less crime in the streets and racism could be less common.

  18. Unfortunately, there are many ways the Criminal Justice System creates criminals and law-breakers. The government sends out undercover cops and agents to areas with “bad” neighborhoods and higher crime rates. According to the film “The House I Live In,” those agents find ways to arrest people whether they are committing an actual crime or if they even look suspicious. The film also stated that more people are getting arrested and sent to jail based off looking suspicious rather than actually committing a crime. This is similar to the stop-and-frisk policy taking place in New York where people are getting stopped and even harassed based off their racial profile. Both are acts of steriotyping by targeting minorities.
    Not only are these “suspicious” arrests taking place, but it also puts these citizens at a disadvantage once they get out of jail. Having a record makes it hard for these criminals to get jobs and other opportunities in life to be successful. They are given a “reputation” and are sent out on their own with out rehab and with nowhere to go but where they were before jail. This causes them to go back to their habits and are more likely to get arrested again. The Manditory Minimum system increases the criminals’ sentenced time in jail based off their previous charges. Most are then in prison for life. It’s a viscous cycle set up by the government based off stereotypes and assumptions in order for the prison’s to make money while little is done to make sure illegal activies don’t continue once prisoners are released.

  19. Multiple aspects are involved when dictating in how criminals are created by the justice system. One way would be through agencies which hire individuals to investigate in areas where suspicious persons loiter, causing problems, providing a reason to further investigate the suspicious individual, eventually making an arrest. A countless amount of charges are made solely on suspicious acts rather than actual crime, sometimes on normal people from the wrong side of the tracks. Narrowing in on one specific group, minorities are viewed in a different light, often causing prejudice attitudes. This stereotypical attitude goes back into history, even occurring when FHA had build many residential areas and minorities were prohibited to purchase these homes. Many people at the minority disadvantage lived in areas referred to as “red-lined”, where cops would focus their attention on minority areas and any sort of activity occurring. The concept of the “Mandatory Minimum”, a court decision setting where judicial discretion is limited due to the law, led to creating undeserved long-term jail time for many so-called criminals. While imprisoned, no positive programs were intervened, such as rehabilitation programs. Due to the lack of rehabilitation help, criminals would habitually go back to drugs, alcohol, etc. as soon as exiting jail—only to find themselves back in jail again. Another concept at hand is that many jails rely on criminal activity and court cases to keep them funded and able to keep facilities up to date. All in all, there are a major amount of efforts and people to keep this criminal chain going, whether the charges be drugs trafficking, or violent actions, even if these “criminals” are not criminals at all.

  20. The justice system creates criminals every day with laws that don’t make sense and a system that needs to be updated. The justice turns people into lawbreakers with laws that don’t exactly make sense or using some sort of excuse to make arrests. Officers use profiling, which is the cause of an unequal race proportions in jails.
    One way the criminal justice system creates law breakers is with profiling those they think would fit the stereotypes they know for crimes. Or stopping a car for something minor with the intention of threatening them into consenting to a search.
    A way that these lawbreakers are made into criminals is with drug users. Putting a drug user in jail for ten years, then letting them go without treatment doesn’t make any sense because they will most likely be released and go right back to using drugs and will most likely be profiled this time because they are a criminal and eventually go back to jail.
    The long term consequences of this is a war on drugs that cannot be solved. It’s a vicious circle that ruins families and doesn’t help anybody; it just creates something to target or to possibly take the public’s attention off of the real issues the country is facing at the time. Criminals, especially criminals with drug related offenses, are easily made to be the bad guy and the cause of problems when that isn’t usually the reality.

  21. After lectures, videos, personal experience and readings it is easy to see how the criminal justice system creates criminals itself and many negative consequences both long and short from it. After watching a video in class it disgusted me that a man of the law would stereotype people they saw driving based of skin color and after years of doing this gained “sense” for finding criminals and illegal doings going on. If you think something is a certain way you will eventually begin to see everything that way. If you assume black people are always up to no good and drug dealers that is all you will look for. Any white person out there will be over looked because of your naïve, closed minded ways. Just off personal experience over eighty percent of drug dealers I have heard of, seen or know are white… So with that being said I am supposed to assume every white person is a drug dealer? I think not. I just think it is ridiculous how the government looks for drugs and crime in the “ghettos” and not at suburban areas. Of course they will find petty drug usage and deals. People choose that route because of the justice system. Once convicted of a felony or drug charge basically places a red flag on their resume, ultimately leaving them over-looked for jobs and unable to find any type of work. After being punished for not having a job and scowled by society for not fixing their lives “criminals” are then forced to go back to the ways of their old doings. Slanging dope or doing by whatever means necessary to not even try and fix their lives but just to get by. Do you really think people would choose selling crack versus having a stable job with benefits? I personally don’t think so. But that is just me, the justice system is so flawed and sets people up to end up in a downward spiral that keeps them going back to their old ways or end up in person or worse, even death. The crack vs. cocaine ratio is so messed up as well. Crack is mostly found in the ghetto where most police reside and cocaine, “the rich-man’s drug” is found in suburban higher class areas. Drugs are drugs, the ration should be 1:1 not this flawed uneven ratio where of course more cases of crack will be filed every year with more media in the ghetto reporting all the bad things going on. This isn’t something new that has been going on in the United States either, back in the Nixon and Regan era. This has created a negative long term affect in our society. Kids grow up believing colored kids are at risk to do drugs, commit crimes and do bad things and whites are safe, friendly and clean. When realistically these “laws” are set out to keep people in poverty from ever reaching middle class or dare I say it the upper-class. It makes me cringe when you just sit on a bench, on the bus or anywhere and observe people’s reactions to other people of different color. You can see it in their eyes the judging and assumptions from what the media has flooded their minds and what the criminal justice system has led us to believe. Just sitting on a bus the other day I saw two girls grip their person when a man of color sat next to them. The media has made people to believe there is a profile of how criminals look and dress. When most people haven’t taken the time to ask what if that person is unable to afford new clothing? That is just one example but if people just opened their eyes and became more open-minded it would make society that much of a better place for everyone to live in. Just imagine if police stopped profiling people and actually searched for criminals based on facts and patrolled every neighborhood within cities? I wouldn’t be surprised if crime rate dropped in the ghettos and raised in others, or even if the ratio of white to colored people became closer in numbers. Just food for thought.

  22. In our country, the Criminals Justice System creates law breakers and criminals through different ways in our society. Police will pay much more attention to poverty struck neighborhoods where crime rates are high snooping around for suspicious activity. In the movie watched, “The House I live in,” policemen will arrest people even if there looking suspicious. Sense a lot of minorities live in low income neighborhoods, racial profiling can happen where they will either pull over or use the stop and frisk policy on them. Minorities will live in “red-lined” areas; these areas are focused on more by police. Unfortunately in our society more minorities will be stop and frisked because they are known to live in higher crime rate areas. If they are found with even a little amount of drugs than they will most likely be arrested. In the film I stated above, they said that a lot of prisoners were arrested for just looking suspicious when they didn’t even commit a crime. When an individual is arrested, they will from then on out have a criminal record. This makes it difficult to find a job which leads to them performing crimes once again, selling drugs or stealing. Children will look up at their parents and are taught that selling drugs is the only way they can make money. In a film we watched, a drug dealing parent said to his son that one day he will be able to make his own money by selling drugs. The parent s rub off on their kids and it starts a cycle amongst low income areas where a criminal record will keep them in the ghetto instead of getting a decent job that doesn’t involve crime. A lot of people, who needed rehabilitation while in jail, didn’t receive any sort of help so they leave jail the way they came into jail. This accompanies for more of the cycle that occurs. A prisoner who enters jail and leaves jail the same way will have a criminal record as well as performing the same acts they did before getting arrested which puts them back in jail again and so on. If the criminal justice system could try and rehabilitate more prisoners than the crime rate could decrease.

  23. There are several ways to create criminals itself through wrong knowledge of stereotypes. The problem in the society is that when people are pull over and taken to jail they have not been taught of what they have done. The only reasons why they taken over is started from little suspicious and finding reasons to arrest them into jail for drugs up to 10 years. Authorities are not only looking for committed crimes but also stereotyping looking for suspicious. The biggest problems of stereotypes are comes from ethic or demographics. If there is an area with high crime rates and poor, authorities will look at these regions more than other regions because there has been crime in the past and assume people who live there are associated with crimes. It does not give people the freedom to target innocent people who simply live in a bad area. Too often, regular people are imprisoned simply due to suspicion, and authorities have no actual proof of a crime being committed. These assumptions that upper class society come to are often inaccurate and cause for a focus to be directed to the poor. When an individual is arrested and released from jail, they are difficult to find a job with criminal record in this society. When no one gives them a new chance or a new opportunity to life, they going seeking to their old habits. The wrong perception from society makes them committing crime again by selling drugs or stealing. During the lecture, we watched film that was about a drug dealing father teaches to his son how to make money by selling drugs because he knows that the society do not want to hire or give him new chance to start over. In long-term consequences of this wrong stereotype and perception is continuing the cycle will never end unless the criminal justice system could try and rehabilitate more prisoners than the crime rate could decrease.

  24. In the movie “The house I Live In” , we learned that some crimes so-called ” justice system ” brought . The American system of criminal justice is set up to deal with the general criminals, to aim possible criminal behavior. However, with the number of serious drug offenses increasing in different ethnic populations. in around 1950 , the police began to focus on increasing attention on the black community . Because in the black community , the poor and the homeless rate is higher than in other regions , which makes it easier for police to find drug offenders there. For this reason, blacks were considered more likely to commit crimes than whites , in fact, high crime rates does not matter with the region of black community . The house built by FHA on sale are often reluctant to blacks or Latinos , Because are also relevant to their prejudices . FHA sellers reluctant to sell their houses because they think black and Latino people are ignorant and loud , if there is such people live in the house , put the value of the house pulled down . On the contrary , the fact that drug use populations of white people are the majority . The criaml justice system always put attition on some minorities, and some of themwho would not otherwise criminal eventually become criminals.

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